Photo credit:  Shannon O’Connor .

Photo credit: Shannon O’Connor.

About

Artist Bio, 2018

Tyler Mackie (1981) lives and works in her hometown of Portland, OR, and holds a B.F.A in Studio Arts from Oregon State University (2005), and an M.F.A. in Studio Arts from Louisiana State University (2009). Her work focuses on pleasure, the body, movement, trauma, consent, ritual prettiness, handicraft, object-ness, and the ready-made. Themes within her work manifest the divine, wounded, surreal, and everyday contradictions of a lived female experience - making space for comfort to confront discomfort.

Public art projects include Park It!, a temporary group installation in Madison Wisconsin (2010), Bridge for Blankets, an installation for Portland's Broadway Bridge Centennial (2013). Creative contributions are ongoing as a member of the international, collaborative collective, Expanded Draught (2009-present).

Recent solo and group exhibitions include I say: RADICAL, You say: FEMINIST, at Archer Gallery | Clark College curated by Senseney Stokes (group), Can Touch This at Paragon Gallery curated by Public Annex (group), Intimate Spaces at Chehalem Cultural Center (solo), and The Bleed is Working at Wolff Gallery (solo).

Mackie’s practice encompasses work with painting, soft-sculpture, fiber, embroidery, and healing plants.

Artist Statement, 2018

Mackie’s work manifests the divine, wounded, and everyday contradictions of a lived female-bodied experience.

The work employs notions of the body, movement, ritual, and object-ness - making space for comfort and discomfort to coexist. In these spaces, revelrous rebellion is pursued in gestures that feel deliciously wrong. Here, it is necessary for the unsettling to be interwoven within the decorative and pretty.

Familiar home good materials take on a new life and gain a strange anonymity, discreet yet related to their former function. Questions of access and consent are raised in liminal encounter with the work. Who, or what, gains access here?

How does the viewer process gestures that are permitted to simultaneously swaddle and smother? How do we communicate pleasure and pain? Acknowledge the palpable conflict, and make room for an authentic response.

Mackie’s work asks us to look to those moments where we are vulnerable and drawn to hold space for one another. It advocates that we make room for a genuine, careful, compassionate, and uncomfortable practice; pointing to the tender ways that we express joy, anger, delight, pain, and the beauty of being viscerally, unapologetically human.

Photo credit:  Shannon O’Connor .

Photo credit: Shannon O’Connor.

Photo credit:  Shannon O’Connor .

Photo credit: Shannon O’Connor.

Photo credit:  Shannon O’Connor .

Photo credit: Shannon O’Connor.

Photo credit:  Shannon O’Connor .

Photo credit: Shannon O’Connor.